A Clinical Overview of Oculocin Propo

Shonit Jagmohan Optometrist  BOptom (Hons)  PA Cert.  Orthokeratologist

The ocular surface requires a delicate balance to ensure good health and stable vision. Standard methods of restoration and maintenance of this delicate balance includes a healthy diet, over-the-counter “dry eye drops”, and therapeutic anti-infective and anti-inflammatory eye drops.

Oculocin Propo is non-preserved, and made from Chamomile, Aloe Vera and Propolis. Evidence based literature on the safety and effectiveness of these natural constituents is widely known. However, there is still a lack of literature showing their efficacy as an eye drop for ocular surface diseases, with only one research paper published to date.

Case Study – Mrs BM

This 63 year old was referred from an optometrist colleague for her chronic dry eyes. She was complaining of irritable eyes, and felt like she could ‘constantly feel her eyes’, especially when blinking. Mrs BM also felt her vision fluctuate at times, and thought her vision sometimes looked foggy.

She has tried a number of different lubricants and over-the-counter eye drops, gels and ointments over the years. The most effective of these, a preservative-free gel, which she only uses at night, given the blurred vision she experiences when using it during the day. All other eye drops provided her a very limited period of relief.

Ocular health findings showed staining mostly along a horizontal band in the interior cornea (fig. 1), consistent with chronic dry eyes and excessive exposure. There was some mild meibomian gland dysfunction, and minimal meibum expressed with heat and pressure. There was no significant anterior blepharitis, and her ocular health was otherwise unremarkable.

Ocular health findings showed staining mostly along a horizontal band in the interior cornea (fig. 1), consistent with chronic dry eyes and excessive exposure. There was some mild meibomian gland dysfunction, and minimal meibum expressed with heat and pressure. There was no significant anterior blepharitis, and her ocular health was otherwise unremarkable.

For short term relief, I prescribed BM an intensive course of Oculocin Propo, recommending 1 drop every 2 hours for the first two days, and then four times a day thereafter. She kept using her gel at night.

On review, 2 weeks later, I noted a marked improvement with the corneal integrity, with minimal staining found (fig. 2), and a marked improvement with her tear break-up time. Mrs BM felt her eyes had ‘not felt this good in a long time’, and could not believe ‘an eye drop had finally worked’ for her.

Further recommendations were given for lid hygiene and dry eye support, including nutritional supplementation. Mrs BM now uses Oculocin Propo twice a day, and manages her tear film and ocular surface well, experiencing more comfortable eyes, and stable and clear vision.

Cicelyte D. Oculocin Propo Eye Drops with Propolis.  Clinical Effectivity Evaluation Research Report.  2014, Kaunas, Lithuania

Shonit Jagmohan
Optometrist

BOptom (Hons) TPA Cert.
Orthokeratologist

*Shonit is one of the principal optometrist at Vision Camberwell Optometrists, Melbourne 3124